Not all snakes are poisonous. If you see a snake tell us, don’t touch it.

So read the the section headed Critters in the welcome pack at the fabulous and remote cabana we were staying in amongst virgin tropical forest on Isla de San Cristobal in Panama’s beautiful Bocas del Toro archipelago.

It begs the question, “Who’s first response upon seeing a snake in the middle of a tropical island is to try to befriend the slithery little reptile?” Not mine, not ever, but people do crazy things when they leave their normal lives behind it seems. Seriously, this is a part of the world where the deadly Fer-de-lance, a snake known for being “irritable and fast moving” and “excitable and unpredictable”, makes its home. Do not touch the snakes!

Sailing toward Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sailing toward Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

The Bocas del Toro archipelago is famous in these parts, and with good reason. A series of tropical islands fringed by mangroves and white sand beaches floating in the Caribbean Sea; found at the northern tip of Panama, close to the border with Costa Rica, they are a major draw for international and local tourists.

We thought the islands might be over-developed after our stay on the San Blas Islands, so we based ourselves on the relatively obscure Isla de San Cristobal. The moment we saw our cabana on stilts with panoramic views of the ocean and the forest we knew we’d made the right decision. This really was getting away from it all, although having just come from San Blas our need to do so could be disputed.

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

View from the cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

View from the cabana, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Within a few hours of being at the Casa Selva del Mar, we’d swung in hammocks, snorkelled out to the reef, spotted a tree snake (not dangerous apparently, but resisted the urge to touch it), watched humming birds flitting between flowers and seen a very relaxed sloth dangling in a tree. Although the owners will cook for you in the evenings, the cabana has a good kitchen so we brought food including fresh fish and prawns – a luxury when you’re travelling.

We saw several sloths during our stay, twice so low down in the tree that I could have reached out and touched them.

Hummingbird, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Hummingbird, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sloth, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

The heat and the humidity in Panama are pretty overwhelming and, while Bocas del Toro is less humid and there’s a breeze, it is hard to find the motivation to put the book down and get out of the hammock. Pretty much the only thing to do is a little snorkelling out to the reef. If you’re feeling energetic you could kayak around the island or make the long journey to the fridge for cold cerveza.

Happily for us, after a very peaceful first night where the only noise was the wind rustling the leaves of the palm trees, the owner, Izzy, took us out on his boat and we sailed for three hours around the islands near to Isla de San Cristobal. A lovely and relaxing experience, especially with a cold beer in hand.

Sailboat, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sailboat, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

You won’t find any white sand beaches on Isla de San Cristobal, but since there are only six other people staying within the thirty acres of tropical forest that is the Casa Selva del Mar, the peace and quiet is pretty absolute. After seeing the town of Bocas del Toro on the main island of Colon, I was relieved not to be staying there, especially after reports of regular club nights blasting music that could be heard all over town until 4am.

To top off our second day on Isla de San Cristobal we were treated to a spectacular sunset over the water from the elevated deck of our cabana.

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Sunset, Isla de San Cristobal, Bocas del Toro, Panama

5 thoughts on “Not all snakes are poisonous. If you see a snake tell us, don’t touch it.

  1. Signs in hotels are funny things. In Hue, Vietnam we were told that the explosives, the prostitutes and the stinky fruit were not allowed in the rooms. I understood the reminder about the Durian and the prostitutes, but explosives, is it a common problem? But then maybe it was just a bad translation of fireworks, at least that’s the hopeful option. Enjoy your travels……all the best, cheech.

    • That’s hilarious, I wonder what order the hotel management would put those three in? I saw signs in Thailand warning against taking Durian into lifts, and it really does smell terrible!

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