A lazy day on the Rio Magdalena

A visit to Mompox wouldn’t be complete without spending some time exploring the Rio Magdalena, the river that made Mompox rich and famous and, later, reduced it to a sleepy backwater. Luckily, finding a small motor boat and a willing captain isn’t too difficult in a town this size. We also found some other tourists wanting to do the trip which meant the price was very reasonable.

As you set off from the bank of the river you get excellent views of the waterfront in Mompox before motoring slowly down the river spotting birds and iguanas as you go. If you had the inclination and time, it would be possible to float all the way down the Rio Magdalena to the Caribbean. You’d finally emerge somewhere near the industrial city of Barranquilla on the coast.

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

This section of the river seems to flow very slowly, at times is doesn’t seem to move at all. An optical illusion that lends weight to the timeless nature of the river and the communities that lie along its banks. Much of the surrounding countryside is farmland so the chances of seeing a lot of wildlife aren’t great, but the landscapes and waterscapes are really beautiful.

Canoe on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Canoe on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Heron on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Heron on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Tributary of the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Tributary of the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Iguana, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Iguana, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

The Rio Magdalena, Colombia

The Rio Magdalena, Colombia

The Rio Magdalena, Colombia

The Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Eagle on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Eagle on the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

After motoring up the main river we forked off down a smaller tributary towards a couple of huge inland lakes that form part of the vast waterway system of this region. Eventually we stopped at a small village on one of the lakes and had a walk around the streets much to the amusement of the many small children living there. Gringos are still a rare commodity here.

As we made our way back to the boat the sun started to set and the combination of vast sky and still water created magnificent, luminous reflections. It was truly beautiful, especially viewed from the boat in the middle of the lake. We motored back towards Mompox and rejoined the Rio Magdalena in time to enjoy a spectacular river sunset.

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset and reflections in a lake, Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset over the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset over the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset over the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Sunset over the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Arriving back in Mompox after dark we were greeted by a town vividly illuminated and reflected in the sleepy river – truly beautiful.

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

Mompox by night from the Rio Magdalena, Colombia

5 thoughts on “A lazy day on the Rio Magdalena

  1. Stunning! I am a HUGE fan of water—rivers, lakes, the ocean, streams… Just the sound of it makes me happy. Your images are incredible… But, I have to ask, are there any dangerous critters in the water? I always hear tales of water snakes, and piranhas, and alligators and the like…

    • There are small crocodiles, caimans, but they’re not really a threat to people. There are bound to be snakes, but not sure if they have big anacondas – the local kids don’t seem too worried, they’re always jumping in and fooling around in the river. When we were in the Bolivian Amazon, we met an Australian woman who had several nasty bites on her legs after swimming in a river. Her guide said the fish responsible was a ‘biting sardine’, but when she showed her bites to a local guide he said it was piranhas. We all freaked out a little!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s