Bangkok, Temple City

Buddhism seems like such a peaceful ‘religion’*. Yet, like all institutions with vested interests, it has the capacity for violent factionalism, meddling in politics and generating vast amounts of money that might better be spent on helping the needy and marginalised. So it is in Thailand. As a tourist you wouldn’t notice, but a dispute rages within Thai Buddhism.

Monks at prayer, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Monks at prayer, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Mai Amataros Phrasomdet Bangkhunphrom, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Mai Amataros Phrasomdet Bangkhunphrom, Bangkok, Thailand

Monk statue, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Monk statue, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

At the heart of this struggle, an insurgent Buddhist sect is taking on a conservative establishment strongly aligned with both the monarchy and military junta that runs the country. The dispute centres around the appointment of a new spiritual leader for Thai Buddhism, the Supreme Patriarch. Thais haven’t had a spiritual leader since 2013 and, as the dispute gets more political, the position continues to remain empty.

These frictions aside, the many Buddhist temples that are scattered around the Thai capital provide a peaceful alternative to life on Bangkok’s hectic streets. A little like being in Rome, it’s practically impossible to walk far without bumping into a temple or monastery, the radiant colours of the buildings sparkling under the intense sun. It’s not unusual to see orange robed monks on the streets.

There are over four hundred wats, or temples, in Bangkok, but you can add to that number many more shrines that are everywhere around the city. Some of the wats are massive complexes, frequently swamped by tourists, others are small and far from the tourist trail.

Finding myself in the Phra Nakhon District of central Bangkok it was hard to miss Wat Bowonniwet Vihara Rajavaravihara. This is a major Buddhist temple with plenty of royal connections and a steady stream of worshipers coming and going. Numerous princes have studied at this temple, including King Bhumibol Adulyadej, or Rama IX as the current Thai monarch is known.

Wat Mai Amataros Phrasomdet Bangkhunphrom, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Mai Amataros Phrasomdet Bangkhunphrom, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Making floral offerings, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Making floral offerings, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Initiates, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Initiates, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Monk, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Monk, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Given the reverence that the majority of Thais have for their king, it’s no surprise that this is a popular temple. The most striking feature from outside the temple is the large golden chedi or stupa that majestically rises into the sky; inside, the ornate decoration of the temple is equally impressive. In one temple monks were praying in front of a large Buddha statue.

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Not that visiting a Buddhist temple is all spirituality, it’s also fraught with danger. As with many places of worship, you’re required to remove your shoes when entering certain parts of the temple complex. When I got to the main stupa I had to remove my flip flops before ascending some steps into a courtyard.

The floor of the courtyard had been exposed to an intense sun for several hours, and the bare stone floor felt hot enough to fry an egg on. I swear I got third-degree burns on the soles of my feet. At least the sight of me running from one patch of shade to another gave a couple of Thai families some amusement.

Making floral offerings, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Making floral offerings, Buddhist temple, Bangkok, Thailand

Temple paintings, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Temple paintings, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Temple paintings, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Temple paintings, Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

Wat Bowonniwet Vihara, Bangkok, Thailand

For safety reasons, I stuck to shaded areas after this painful experience, and visited several buildings where there were glorious paintings on the walls. These are common in Buddhist temples everywhere in the world, and depict instructional scenes from the Buddha’s life, as well as scenes of Thai daily life. They are very colourful and rather beautiful.

* I'm no expert, but arch-atheist Richard Dawkins makes the case in The 
God Delusion that, rather than a religion, Buddhism is more like an 
ethical or philosophical system.

7 thoughts on “Bangkok, Temple City

  1. Pingback: Religious tiger abuse in Thailand | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  2. Very beautiful. Thanks for the visit. A high wai to you.
    (Have you read Burdett’s thai detective stories?)
    Oh, and when your NGO decides to do something in Mexico, let me know, maybe I can help.
    Cheers

    • Hi Brian, I don’t know Burdett’s books (I think I’ve led a sheltered life). Just googled him and it sounds interesting, I’ll put him on my reading list for the next trip to Thailand.
      I’d love for us to be working in Mexico (mainly out of self interest – I’d hop on a plane to Mexico tomorrow if I could). I’ll let you know.
      Hope all’s well? Summer is on the way in the Low Countries, which is why we’ve had snow and hail all week!

      • Haha! Burdett’s books are interesting, because written from a Thai perspective, though he’s a Brit. When I read him I sometimes feel I am living in Bangkok! What’s your organization’s name? I think you told me once, but I forgot. A stroke of goldfish memory. And here is the best season of the year. (Let’s open up the Mexico branch) Tot ziens

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s