Exploring the legend of the Maid of Orléans

We arrived in Orléans around midnight after a long drive, and a detour around an industrial estate on the outskirts of the town thanks to a sat nav error. Midnight is never a great time to arrive anywhere, but crossing the River Loire and driving through the centre of town we could already tell Orléans was a lovely place. This didn’t stop me wondering how safe Orléans would be for an Englishman?

This is, after all, the spiritual home of the Maid of Orléans, better known to the world as Joan of Arc. Sworn enemy of the English, she is credited with defeating the English armies besieging Orléans in 1429; a pivotal moment in the Hundred Years War which many would say saved France from complete collapse. Shortly afterwards the English army was in retreat and town-after-town fell to French forces led by Joan.

Statue of Joan of Arc, Place du Martroi, Orléans, France

Statue of Joan of Arc, Place du Martroi, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, Orléans, France

Not bad for an illiterate farmers daughter who claimed to be guided by the voice of God. Joan was captured a year later – presumably God was busy that day- found guilty of heresy and burned at the stake. In fact she was burned twice to make certain there weren’t any body parts left which could be used as relics. The English weren’t taking any chances.

Joan is a massively popular heroine in these parts, and Orléans honours her with a huge statue in the main square. We hadn’t planned it, but our visit coincided with the final preparation for the Fêtes de Jeanne d’Arc, a big festival celebrating Orléans’ favourite daughter. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to stay for the big parade … besides, that might have been pushing our luck.

History, and urban planners haven’t been kind to Orléans. Many of its medieval buildings were knocked down in the 20th century, while both German and Allied bombing during the Second World War did further damage. This has now been partially reversed by a decade-long restoration of the fabulous Vieille Ville, Orléans’ old medieval centre.

In fact, central Orléans is a very attractive place. It has two focal points, the vast pedestrianised Place du Martroi, and the equally vast Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, which sits dramatically at the eastern end of Rue de Jeanne d’Arc. On our final night in town the front of the cathedral was illuminated with a multicoloured projection of Joan. It was beautiful.

Orléans sits picturesquely on a large bend in the legendary Loire River, which snakes its way south-west from here through this extraordinary region. Dotted as it is with numerous, glorious château and historic towns, the entire Loire Valley has been given UNESCO World Heritage status. Perhaps it’s the popularity of these other attractions, but for some reason Orléans doesn’t seem to get many tourists.

Marianne, Orléans, France

Marianne, Orléans, France

Place de la Republique, Orléans, France

Place de la Republique, Orléans, France

Timber-framed buildings, Orléans, France

Timber-framed buildings, Orléans, France

Timber-framed buildings, Orléans, France

Timber-framed buildings, Orléans, France

Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, Orléans, France

Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, Orléans, France

That’s a shame, it’s an interesting place and makes for a good base from which to explore the eastern part of the Loire Valley. It also has one of the nicest hotels I’ve stayed in in recent times, the Hôtel de l’Abeille. In a town with a reputation for mediocre hotels, it’s a real find. After our late arrival we greeted the new day keen to explore our first stop in France, and headed for a coffee in the Place du Martroi…

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d'Orléans, Orléans, France

Joan of Arc projection, Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans, Orléans, France

5 thoughts on “Exploring the legend of the Maid of Orléans

  1. Quite lovely. CAn you believe I’ve never been to Orleans. To the Amazon yes, but not there… 🙂
    I’m sure there is a statute of limitations for burning at the stake, but indeed downplaying your “englishness” was wise. Where else did you go? Tours? Blois? Amboise?

    • Hi Brian, Orleans is a fabulous place, really enjoyed it. Not there right now, it was a couple of weeks ago now, I’m having difficulty keeping up. We went to Tours, but have to go back for Blois, Amboise and much more that we could do on this trip.
      You’ll be glad to hear I’ve got a trip to Paris planned (€40 return on a special promo with Thalys), but not until September. I’ll be asking for recommendations!

      • Well it’s a good thing you’re not there any more: it’s flooded! That was quite a fast trip. Glad a bout Paris. We won’t coincide, I’ll be there in August, but do remind me beforehand so I can send you a custom-made programme for Paris. (Why does WP underline programME? Americans!)

        • Unbelievable weather in France and Germany, it’s pretty damp in the Netherlands but nothing quite so catastrophic. We only had 5 days, not enough, but enough to whet the appetite for a return visit. Any and all advice on Paris welcome – I thought August might be too hot, but given the weather so far this ‘summer’…

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