Schloss Schwerin, a fairytale castle on Lake Schwerin

Sitting picturesquely on an island in Lake Schwerin, the glorious Schloss Schwerin is a magnificent sight as you approach along the lake shore. Its pale stone seems to reflect the sun, making it glow softly in the morning light. It’s considered to be one of the best existing examples in Europe of the historic-romanticism architectural style. Basically, it looks like a building straight out of the overwrought imagination of a Disney film set designer, although it wouldn’t look out of place amongst the chateau in the Loire Valley.

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

I arrived in the morning in the car and was able to drive right up to the castle entrance. I was hoping to find a car park, but instead found three security guards, who advised me that I couldn’t park there. This, it turned out, was because the castle still houses the State Parliament of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and they’re a bit wary of strangers parking their cars near to where the parliamentarians enter the building. Sadly, the Far Right AfD are the second largest party in the parliament, which takes away some of the fun of a visit.

It was sunny so I decided to start with a stroll around the expansive parklands. The main grounds are on the mainland, accessible via a bridge from the island on which the castle sits. I walked down the garden’s central avenue to get a spectacular view back down to the castle. Walking through shady woodland I reached the lake shore for even more extravagant views of the castle across the water. Following the lake edge I made my way back to the castle and the well maintained gardens. It was still early and there weren’t many people around, adding to the serenity.

There has probably been a castle or fort here since the 10th century, but the castle you see today dates from extensive 19th century remodelling and rebuilding in preparation for accommodating the court of the Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The aristocratic House of Mecklenburg ruled Mecklenburg-Schwerin for eight centuries, playing a role in virtually all major European conflicts during that period. They were influential in the unification of Germany in 1871, before being abolished during the Weimar Republic in 1918, following Germany’s defeat in the First World War.

This place has seen some history. It has also accumulated a number of art collections, including an incredible collection of Masters from the Flemish and Dutch Golden Age now housed in the nearby Staatliches Museum. Inside the castle itself (€8.50 entrance), the well preserved Grand Ducal Apartments are the main attraction. There is still some renovation work going, part of ongoing efforts to have the castle listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site, which meant some parts of the castle weren’t open.

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Gardens, Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

Schloss Schwerin, Germany

The luxurious interiors are sumptuous on the eye, with gold gilding everywhere and beautifully painted ceilings. Thanks to the relative obscurity of Schwerin there were few other people visiting and no tour groups. It’s not often you can say that if you’re visiting such a historic place these days. The Grand Duke’s throne room is perhaps the finest of all the rooms. Like any good castle, Schloss Schwerin comes with a ghost, the legendary Petermannchen – whose only crime it seems to me, was to be a person of restricted height.

It took me a little over an hour to complete the full tour, there are English translations of the information boards, which is helpful, but there’s not a lot else to detain you. It meant I had a bit of time left to visit the gardens again before heading to Lubeck and the next part of this mini German roadtrip.

2 thoughts on “Schloss Schwerin, a fairytale castle on Lake Schwerin

  1. I love the history you include of the places you visit in your blog. I’m hoping to visit Germany next year and this is great inspiration.

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