Amsterdam’s Festival of Light

I had high expectations for the Amsterdam Light Festival, particularly after the runaway success of Eindhoven’s GLOW Festival a few weeks ago. To add some extra excitement to proceedings the weather forecast claimed it was going to be a dry evening. After days of foul weather, that seemed like reason enough to stump up €40 for two tickets on a boat ride around the festival route.

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

I’ve never been on a boat on Amsterdam’s canals, even at night it gives you a unique perspective on the city that you just don’t get on foot or cycle. In the traditional Dutch manner, no one has curtains and so as you sail along you can see into most people’s homes. The glimpses of domestic life were as fascinating (if not more so) as the Light Festival.

I’m mystified by the Dutch habit of not covering windows. It’s not as if they’re unaware of the existence of curtains, blinds and other ways of dissuading people from looking into your home. I once saw a man having breakfast in front of a window with his dressing gown open wide enough to put me off my breakfast. At moments like this I remind myself that this was the birthplace of Big Brother.

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

The sculptures were themed around the concept of ‘Friendship’. This doesn’t seem to have ignited the imagination of the artists. There were some interesting installations, but many were underwhelming, and in a couple of cases not actually illuminated. In the end the boat ride – and looking through people’s windows – was the best thing about the festival.

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

There were some outstanding sculptures: the intricate Crossing Paths strung across the canal like crazy string; My Light is Your Light, a depiction of refugees trudging towards safety, neon people reflecting in the canal; two Talking Heads sitting across the canal from each other, animated by 4000 LED lights; the running, leaping neon person in Run Beyond; and the surreal Polygonum. All worth seeing.

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam's Light Festival, Netherlands

Amsterdam’s Light Festival, Netherlands

The festival can be seen from the roads and bridges, but it is best viewed from canal level. The boat trip – highly recommended – took 75 minutes and came with free glühwein. Given how cold I was by the time our boat pulled into the dock in front of Central Station, the glühwein was a lifesaver.

Deciding we needed to be indoors, we joined the Friday night crowds and headed for the warmth of our favourite Amsterdam bar.

6 thoughts on “Amsterdam’s Festival of Light

  1. Ah, sorry it was underwhelming, but I am glad to know what it’s like. On the open windows, my Dutch relatives tell me the national habit dates back to the Spanish rule, when the Dutch were required to keep their front windows open to ensure that there were no unauthorized religious/political gatherings as the struggle for independence began. You will notice that it’s only the living room windows that are kept open — other rooms are less visible.

    • That is true of course, it is only the living room! Interesting historical origin, it makes sense that a law like that would be introduced by the Spanish. There was a similar thing in Maoist China, where the traditional ‘courtyard’ life of families was banned and people came out onto the streets and into the parks so everything was in the open.

    • Happy NY Brian. Cuba was fascinating, challenging for a whole host of reasons, not least the accommodation and travel ‘crisis’ over Xmas and NY thanks to half of Europe being in the country. A lot of tourists travelling independently, but also lots and lots of (mainly Canadian/European) tour groups being whisked from their all-inclusive resorts on the northern coast on short trips. I’d be interested to know how daughter No. 2 found it? How was Colombia?

  2. Ha! Nice images, and yes, I can relate to being slightly underwhelmed by the event….. I recently attended an event (thankfully free) and came away wondering what all the fuss was about 🙂

    • I think we find ourselves in a era of overstatement and events have a lot of competition. To be fair to the Amsterdam Light festival the photos from previous years made it look wonderful…apparently photos never lie!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s