Unearthing ancient history in beautiful Segovia

If the quiet nighttime streets in Segovia’s medieval heart are anything to go by, most people seem to visit this magnificent town on day trips from Madrid. During the day the streets buzz with activity, and tour groups crowd into the 12th century Alcázar, around the square beneath the monumental aqueduct, and through the narrow lanes that connect the two. At night though, the town has a different personality, the streets empty and the sound of footsteps on cobbles can be heard echoing in alleyways.

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Segovia, Spain

Segovia, Spain

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

I’m glad we spent a night here, it allowed us to get a sense of the rhythm of life in the town. Perched high on a rocky outcrop and surrounded by walls and medieval gates, Segovia is an historic gem. By the time the Romans arrived around 80 BC, there had already been a settlement here for 700 years. When the Roman Empire disintegrated in the 5th century, they left behind the extraordinary aqueduct that is still the most impressive feature of the town.

Moorish invaders captured Segovia in the early 8th century, ushering in three hundred years of Islamic rule. It was recaptured by Alfonso VI of León and Castile in 1079, part of the centuries-long Reconquista of the Iberian Peninsular. It was shortly after this that Segovia’s other major attraction, the Alcázar, was built over the original Moorish fort, which in turn had been built on top of the Roman fort. It was to become one of the principle royal residences of Castile.

The Alcázar was the site of one of Spain’s foundational moments in 1474, when Queen Isabella I was proclaimed Queen of Castile. She would go on to marry Ferdinand II of Aragon, uniting Spain’s Christian kingdoms politically. Together they completed the reconquest of Spain from the Moors, and then commissioned Christopher Columbus to discover the Americas. The slightly odd Central European spires that adorn the Alcázar today, were added by King Philip II when he married Anna of Austria. Presumably to make her feel more at home.

We started our day with a walk through the quiet streets to the Plaza Azoguejo, over which towers the 28.5 metre high aqueduct. It truly is an amazing sight, not to mention an incredible feat of engineering. The whole thing stretched for 16km, delivering water from the River Frío into the heart of Segovia, and didn’t use any mortar or cement. We walked under the main arches of the aqueduct and then turned up some steps to follow the route it takes through the town.

It’s majestic and a little surreal, people’s houses co-exist ‘cheek by jowl’ with the arches as the aqueduct cuts through sleepy neighbourhoods. We strolled the full length of the remaining structure before wandering back downhill to the historic centre. We popped into the Mesón de Cándido, one of the town’s most famous restaurants, for a drink and then headed back through the town towards the Alcázar. Things were busier now, with plenty of tour groups milling around, but it’s fairly easy to lose the crowds if you avoid the main streets.

The Alcázar is a fantastical building, all narrow towers and pointy turrets, which is said (probably wrongly) to have been the model for the original Disneyland castle. We went to buy our tickets and the man behind the counter asked if we were European Union citizens. “Yes”, we said, “from the UK.” He gave us a pitying smile and said, “It’s free for EU citizens, but not for you for much longer.” Yet another reminder of the loss every British person will suffer when Brexit happens.

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Alcázar, Segovia, Spain

Plaza Mayor, Segovia, Spain

Plaza Mayor, Segovia, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Segovia aqueduct, Spain

Inside, the Alcázar is just as fantastical. The Hall of the Galley and Hall of the Kings, both have the most extraordinary ceilings, decorated with gold leaf and images of Kings and Queens past. We made our way around the building until we emerged into the sunlight outside the armoury. The views were spectacular, and it really gave us a clear idea of how the Alcázar is constructed on a cliff edge. All that history had given us an appetite, so we wandered back through the town to the Plaza Mayor for another tour around the tapas bars.

5 thoughts on “Unearthing ancient history in beautiful Segovia

    • I think you may be right, Brian. I once studied a course on Utopias (called ‘Sir Thomas More and his Age’), weeks of studying writings about Utopian ideals and Utopian societies revealed little, other than Utopia doesn’t, cannot, exist. All utopias become dystopian because they don’t recognise the innate human need for perspective and diversity. It’s the same with beauty, it only has meaning if you’ve seen the opposite to compare it to.

      • A fascinating course. You may be right about Beauty. I once realized, standing in front of Notre-Dame that I had been chasing Beauty all over the world, while all the time I had it there, right in front of me. 🙂
        And then, drawing my Plato out, I can’t help but think that there must be an Idea of Beauty somewhere… 😉

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s