Scenes from Semana Santa in Malaga

It might have been the constant pounding of the drums, or the clouds of incense, or even the mournful songs that accompany some of the processions. Ultimately, I blame the over consumption of Torrijas, the sickly sweet traditional pudding of bread soaked in egg and milk before being fried and served up to unsuspecting tourists, but after a few intense days of non-stop processions, Semana Santa started to feel a little overwhelming. A sure sign it was time to leave the city and head for the hills.

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Semana Santa, Malaga, Adalusia, Spain

Malaga was a lot of fun during Semana Santa, and I suspect it is a fabulous place to visit at any time of year. We visited the Picasso Museum, with a couple of hundred works donated or loaned by Picasso’s relatives; we clambered up the Gibralfaro for fabulous views over the town and ocean; we passed through more overwrought churches than you can shake a stick at; we wandered around the lovely harbour area; and we drank cocktails in wonderful rooftop bars like we truly belonged in the Mediterranean.

Malaga is a town that doesn’t get the appreciation it deserves, but we’ll definitely be going back for more…but for now it was time to sample rural Andalusia.

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